Got Game? Gamers Learn Faster

A team of educational psychologists from the University of Bristol conducted a neuroscience study that found when gaming and accruing higher points over time, your brain quiets down parts associated with mind wandering. Participants experienced increased focus while gaming and earning more and more points. Researchers were studying a brain reigion associated with inattentiveness and were able to see what learning through gaming does in the brain.

video game controller

Gamers and Goal Directed Behavior

Computer games can help with learning as games offer reward conditions and engage players in learing experiences that may improve learning outcomes. The study found that gamer children were more into goal oriented behavior, experienced higher engagement and experienced decreased mind wandering compared to the non-gamer children. MRI studies have shown rewards increase brain reigions associated with working memory. Dopamine neurons fire in response to reward prediction and anticipation.

Improved Visual Skills

The University of Rochester in New York found video games improve visual skills as they found gamers were better at monitoring activity, tracking more objects and were faster at picking out objects from clutter than non-gamers. Gaming may lead to improvements in military and law enforcement training. It may also help treat people with attention and focus problems.

Games and Learning

  • Games increase focus
  • Games lead to faster decision making skills
  • Action gamers' brains are efficient with procesing and collecting visual and auditory information
  • Most learners are motivated by leader boards and friendly competition
  • Educational games increase student engagement
  • Educational game tools motivate students

References

  • Orenstein, David. (2015, March 31). Score! Video gamers may learn visual tasks more quickly. Retrieved from brown.edu
  • Howard-Jones, Paul (2016, January 8). Can computer games improve the ability to study? Retrieved from ac.uk
  • University of Rochester (2010, September 13). Video Games Lead to Faster Decisions that are No Less Accurate. Retrieved from rochester.edu